Low Back Pain – the facts, the causes and the treatment

Do you have low back pain or pain while sitting?

In this article we assess the facts, causes and treatment of low back pain. For an individual assessment you can contact me directly from this link ‘Ask Doctor Ben’ and I will respond as soon as possible.

The Facts:
The low back supports most of the body’s weight, and as a result, is susceptible to pain caused by injury, poor posture or other problems. Over 80% of adults experience low back pain sometime during their life.

The Causes:
It is often difficult to pinpoint the root of low back pain, though poor muscle tone, joint problems, and torn muscles or ligaments are common causes.

A herniated or slipped disc may also cause low back pain as well as sciatica, a condition where pain travels down one or both buttocks and/or legs.
Poor posture and sitting for extended periods and being sedentary increase the risk of developing low back pain and accelerates the deterioration of human health.

low back pain

Poor posture and sitting for extended periods and being sedentary increase the risk of developing low back pain.

In Fact a study * from 2007 indicated that poor posture or sitting improperly leads to a list of negative consequences:

· Increased risk of neck and back problems (vertebral subluxation)
· Abnormal wear and tear on joints, which can lead to arthritis
· Improperly aligned bones and joints, which can lead to fatigue
· Increased strains and pains
· More stress on the ligaments that hold the spine’s joints together
· Interference in the nervous system and the constriction of blood vessels produces headaches, fatigue, organ trouble and breathing problems, all directly traced back to a spine fixed in an abnormal position.
·Science and research continue to confirm

The Treatment:
Many people with low back pain recover without seeing a doctor or receiving treatment. Up to 90% recuperate within three to four weeks, though recurrences are common, and chronic low back pain develops in many people. Low back pain is considered acute, or short-term, when it lasts for a few days up to many weeks. Chronic low back pain refers to any episode that lasts longer than three months.

It is important to have chronic or recurring back pain assessed by a healthcare professional. Potentially serious causes include spinal tumor, infection, fracture, nerve damage, osteoporosis, arthritis, or pain caused by conditions found in internal organs such as the kidneys.

So, how is low back pain treated by your chiropractor? Well, the treatment very much depends on the precise cause of the low back pain. Moreover, each patient must be individually evaluated and managed in the context of the underlying background health status and activity level.

Many different factors can contribute to low back pain. Injury, overwork, emotional and mental stress, menstrual tension, prostate conditions, and problems with posture or weight are common causes.

As your chiropractor, I can offer safe and effective pain relief for many kinds of backaches. If low back pain is intense, or numbing or affecting the legs, see a doctor immediately.

According to research and other evidence, the following self-care steps may be helpful.
• Take care of your back
Practice good workplace and lifestyle habits, such as lifting and standing properly; learn proper exercises to reduce low back pain from a qualified instructor

• Consider seeing a chiropractor
A qualified practitioner may be able to help correct spinal problems that contribute to low back pain.

Chiropractic care helps reverse the negative effects of poor posture, extended sitting, or long-term work at a computer.

Research proves that the cutting edge science of Chiropractic adds years to life and life to years.

Every man, woman, and child deserves to get their spine evaluated and adjusted on a regular basis to ensure a life filled with health and high functioning opportunity!

* The Journal of Neuroscience
1 August 2007, 27(31): 8324-8333
The Neurochemically Diverse Intermedius Nucleus of the Medulla as a Source of Excitatory and Inhibitory Synaptic Input to the Nucleus Tractus Solitarii.
Ian J. Edwards,*, Mark L. Dallas,*, Sarah L. Poole, Carol J. Milligan, Yuchio Yanagawa, Gábor Szabó, Ferenc Erdélyi, Susan A. Deuchars, and Jim Deuchars.

If you have any questions please call us on 087 487 8465 or contact me here ‘Ask Dr. Ben’ and I will be happy to answer any of your questions.

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About the author

Dr. Benjamin Martin is a Chiropractor and speaker on Health and Wellbeing. Ben is regularly called on to discuss health topics and chiropractic on radio, tv and press. His promise is to adjust and educate as many families as possible towards optimal health. His work changes lives and has restored people's quality of life.

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